The Credit Card “Dilemma” and the Canadian Visitor to the United States of America

As a frequent extended visitor to the United States of America (often affectionately referred to as “Snowbirds”), one of the more interesting conundrums we face is to how to cost effectively and efficiently deal with our day-to-day purchases while in the United States. Despite the advent of Bank debit cards, which are available to Snowbirds through an American-based Bank account (or God forbid using “cash”), many of us still to continue to use a Canadian-based bank credit card for our American purchases, simply as a matter of convenience. For the prudent Snowbird (or even the occasional visitor to the U.S.), it is important to understand implications of such a practice and the various other types of payment options which are available, in order to make an informed decision on how best to pay for your U.S. purchases. Depending upon your own personal circumstances, there are several credit card options available with each having their own advantages and disadvantages that are all worth considering by the Canadian Visitor to the United States of America.Read On

“Over the Moon”: The Case of Edmund Joseph “Moon” Marcino vs The Estate of Victoria Kolewaski

 

Roy Kolewaski was born on December 9th, 1926 in Thornhild, AB, the son of John and Julie Kolewaski. He passed away on June 20th 1983 in Guernsey in the Channel Islands. At the time of his death, Roy resided at Alta Vista Rue des Mont Delancey, St. Sampson, Guernsey, Channel Islands and his will was probated in London, England on October 4th , 1983 (file no 84511153208).

He came from a large family of 5 brothers (Joe, Mike, Steve and Victor) and 3 sisters (Mary, Sophie and Helen). He married Victoria Vanderloh in Calgary, Alberta on April 20th, 1950.

 

Victoria Vanderloh was born on January 11th, 1930. She grew up on the family homestead near Munster, Saskatchewan and later lived on the family farm near Craven, Saskatchewan. The family later moved to Maple Creek, Saskatchewan where she finished high school.

The wedding picture of Roy and Victoria Kolewaski

She died tragically in a motor vehicle outside Calgary, Alberta on June 1, 1984 at the age 54. She was buried in Maple Creek, Saskatchewan.

How did a farm kid from Thornhild, AB, a small village or hamlet 90 kilometers north of Edmonton, end up as a self-made “millionaire” living in Guernsey, one of the Channel Islands off the coast of France?

What were the circumstances surrounding the tragic death of Victoria Kolewaski and what was her life story? Why did someone with colorful name of Edmund Joseph “Moon” Marcino end up suing the Estate of Victoria Kolewaski for millions of dollars? How did two young lawyers starting out in their careers become involved in the case, one of whom later became a household name in Canadian politics? Who was Jenny Fairweather and what was her critical involvement in the case? What was the role of a prominent British politician by the name of Jon Kay-Mouat?

This all seems like a script for a Hollywood movie, but in reality it’s one of the most fascinating and interesting cases that I was involved in, over the course of my 35 year career, as a lawyer in Medicine Hat, Alberta and a story that I feel compelled to share. But let’s start at the beginning….READ ON by clicking this link https://drive.google.com/file/d/1L1pva4xLxSCy6VASF7dVoWePJXIM502p/view?usp=sharing

 

A Turkish Delight

A Turkish Delight

I have always enjoyed writing and story telling, as many of my friends will attest. I have written a number of articles lately, having completely retired and have posted some on my personal homepage William J Anhorn QC. My venture into genealogy has resulted in some interesting results, not the least of which is establishing a family connection to royalty, all of which I have documented on the website.

My own life experience has also resulted in some interesting and at times amusing stories and antidotes, which for no other specific reason or purpose, I have decided to document for posterity. The first article along this line is entitled, “Find the Time and Have the Courage to Change and Develop a Plan for the Future”. It is in retrospect, an amusing story regarding my own “life-altering event”, but with a not so subtle message.

Now I know what you are thinking, “since golf season is over he has far too much time on his hands”. But I considerate it therapeutic, a form of occupational therapy!

Here is another story, which you will hopefully find of interest. Read on

Find The Time and The Courage to Change and Develop A Plan for the Future

Many motivational speakers often recite an life altering event or a personal circumstance or tragedy which defined their life and which motivated them to do what they do, which is to spread what they believe is an important message to others. Although I am not inclined to become a motivational speaker and travel the world to enrich people’s lives with my thoughts, my own “life-altering event”, I think is worth sharing and hopefully it can be an inspiration to others to find the time and have the courage to change and to develop a plan for the future, as I did.READ ON

Effective Board Governance and the Role Of Committees

Effective Board Governance and the Role of Committees

 

The structure of a Board and the planning of the Board’s work are key elements to effective governance. Establishing committees is perceived to be one way of better managing the work of the Board, thereby strengthening and enhancing the Board’s governance role.

Historically, it has been common practice for Boards, using a traditional governance model, to strike various standing committees to deal with major functional areas of the organization.  Each Board committee would work closely with the management team or staff member responsible for this functional area. They would work together in addressing issues, solving problems, developing internal policies and establishing plans to monitor performance and compliance within each functional area.

For example, it was commonplace for a Board to establish a human resource or staffing committee, who would work with the HR manager to develop HR policies including hiring, conduct, discipline, compensation and performance. It was expected that the work of the committee would “filter” up to the Board and from time to time the Board would be asked to approve some high level policies. For the most part, however, the establishment of work related policies was left to the committee to approve and for management to implement and the work of the committee was largely unseen by the board, except for approving perfunctory minutes from the committee meetings and receiving a brief verbal report from the chair of the committee at the Board meeting.READ ON