The Medlicott Brothers and The Great War

One of the most interesting facts, which I discovered in researching the Medlicott family history, which is particularly relevant for those family members who were born in North America, is that the family origins can clearly be traced to a certain place…a place where the surname was derived from those who lived on or owned the lands. Few families anywhere can lay claim to such a distinction. Having owned lands or lived at the place from which they took their name, which name has been perpetuated through multiple generations and which now can be found throughout the world, including Australia, the United States and Canada and which place continues to exist is quite a remarkable achievement.

Medlicott continues to this day to be a township in the Parish of Wentnor, Shropshire, England, which is a relatively short distance from the border of Wales. The old Homestead, now called “Medlicott Hall Farm” on the Ordinance Survey, lies on the Western slope of the Longmynd Hill and Forest, near Church Stretton, a distance of some 20 miles south of Shrewsbury.

Given that the Medlicott lands were in relative close proximity to Birkenhead, Cheshire, England and the English port of Liverpool, it not unexpected, as you will see, that many descendants ended up in that area of the country and journeyed through that port throughout the world including to North America, Canada and indeed…..Alberta.

Two such descendants were two brothers, Thomas and Edward Medlicott, who both immigrated to Canada and their life’s story and that of another brother named George is worth documenting and preserving as part of the family history, particularly as it relates to their loyal service to country during the Great War.READ ON

“Now Keep The Glory!”-The Story of a Fallen Soldier from WWI

The Story of a Fallen Soldier from WW1 and Why is important to remember them?

I have always being interested in the study of history and in particular the history of WWI. This keen interest in one of the darkest times in world history was no doubt inspired by my research into the family history of my wife’s family-Medlicott, when during the course of looking through some old photographs, I found pictures of her grandfather and great uncle, who were members of the Canadian Expeditionary Force and who both served gallantly in the Great War. Unlike so many others, they both returned home from the war.

More recently, I had occasion to travel to travel to France and Belgium and to visit such historic WWI sites as Vimy Ridge, Passchendaele, Hill 60 and Ypres. Only in visiting such places does one fully appreciate the full nature and extent of the carnage and the terrible loss of life that occurred as so many young men who heeded the patriotic call and paid paid the ultimate sacrifice. This is a simple but compelling story of a fallen soldier from WW1 and a story which was far too often repeated in the towns and villages throughout the British Empire as the Great War raged on.   Read On

North of the Medicine Line

The Origins and History of the Cypress Hills and a Prominent “Metis” Family from Medicine Hat

Having been born and raised in Medicine Hat and having lived there all of my life, I have a keen interest in its history. More recently, I became interested in genealogy and this interest combined with my passion for local Medicine Hat history resulted in an article entitled, “Demons of the Soul: The Origins and History of the Bliss Family of Medicine Hat and the Infamous Bill Bliss”. For those who grew up in Medicine Hat in the 50’s and 60’s, the name “Bliss” surname was synonymous with Saratoga Park, being one of the many Metis families who resided there. By some accounts, as many as 20 or 30 families resided in this area at one time[1]. Other Metis families during this era included names such as Akers, Bray, Demarais, Gosselins, Cayenne, Gaudry, Lawrence, Laframboise, McKay, Oullettes, Quesnelle and Sanderson and many generations of these families continue to call Medicine Hat their “home”.

Interestingly, many in the Metis community of Medicine Hat can trace their origins to the Cypress Hills and the arrival of the NWMP. READ ON

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The Canadian Medlicotts and World War I

One of the most interesting facts, which I discovered in researching the Medlicott family history, which is particularly relevant for those family members who were born in North America, is that the family origins can clearly be traced to a certain place…a place where the surname was derived from those who lived on or owned the lands. Few families anywhere can lay claim to such a distinction. Having owned lands or lived at the place from which they took their name, which name has been perpetuated through multiple generations and which now can be found throughout the world, including Australia, the United States and Canada and which place continues to exist, is quite remarkable.

Medlicott continues to this day to be a township in the Parish of Wentnor, Shropshire, England, which is a relatively short distance from the border of Wales. The old Homestead, now called “Medlicott Hall Farm” on the Ordinance Survey, lies on the Western slope of the Longmynd Hill and Forest, near Church Stretton, a distance of some 20 miles south of Shrewsbury.

Given that the Medlicott lands were in relative close proximity to Birkenhead, Cheshire, Wales and the English port of Liverpool, it not unexpected, as you will see, that many descendants ended up in that area of the country and journeyed through that port to Australia or North America.  My wife’s Grandfather, Thomas Medlicott was born on November 24th, 1889 in Birkenhead, Cheshire, Wales and passed away on September 1958 at Medicine Hat Alberta, Canada. He married Helen Williams (1891-2012) and they had one child-Norman Thomas. Norman is the father of wife, Joan Elaine Medlicott and she has two other siblings: Charlene Anne and Thomas Clinton. Norman Thomas Medlicott was born in Medicine Hat, Alberta, Canada, on June 29, 1924. In my research to this point, which has been quite exhaustive, I know of no other person born earlier in Alberta, Canada bearing the surname Medlicott. This establishes Norman Thomas Medlicott as one of the earliest if not THE earliest birth record of an Albertan born with the surname MEDLICOTT. Until someone proves otherwise, we will lay claim to this distinction.  READ ON

 

Demons of the Soul

The Origins and History of the Bliss Family of Medicine Hat and the Infamous Bill Bliss

Introduction:

Growing up in Medicine Hat, Alberta during the 50’s and 60’s brings back many fond memories and many interesting experiences. As we grow older and reminisce with family and friends about the past, these memories, for whatever reason, seem to take on greater importance in our lives.

I have always enjoyed reading about history and most recently, I became fascinated with the history of WWI. This was prompted by the discovery of pictures of my wife’s grandfather Thomas Medlicott and her great uncle, Edward Medlicott, who were both members of the Canadian Expeditionary Force and who served gallantly overseas in the Great War. Both of these brothers were fortunate enough return to Canada from that conflict, while another brother George Medlicott, a member of the British Army, was not as lucky. He paid the ultimate sacrifice on the battlefield of France, (Flanders) having been killed in action on the 6th of June 1918.

Recently, I had occasion to travel to France and Belgium and visited the Vimy Ridge Canadian War Memorial and famous WWI landmarks and cemeteries including familiar places or names like Ypres, Passchendaele and the infamous Hill 60, among many others. This evoked an even greater interest and passion in this remarkable chapter of our world history. READ ON

The Holten Canadian War Cemetery Memorial Project and a Tribute to the Fallen Soldiers from Medicine Hat

I have always had a keen interest in history and more recently genealogy and from time to time have researched and endeavoured to document my family history, for what purpose, I was not exactly sure. I have always enjoyed researching and writing, which was a natural mainstay of my chosen profession. In my retirement, I continued with this passion for writing and created my own blog, where I posted many of my articles on genealogy and other topics that I found of interest. (http://wjanhorn.ca or simply search William J Anhorn QC). Most recently, my genealogical research and interest in history intersected resulting in this fascinating article entitled, “The Holten War Cemetery Memorial Project and a Tribute to the Fallen Canadian Soldiers from Medicine Hat”.
READ ON

A Distinguished Victoria Cross Recipient and a Medlicott Family Connection

I have always enjoyed reading about history and more recently, I became fascinated with the history of WWI. This was prompted by the discovery of pictures of my wife’s grandfather and great uncle, Thomas and Edward Medlicott, who were members of the Canadian Expeditionary Force and who served gallantly overseas in the Great War. Most recently, I had occasion to travel to France and Belgium and visited the Vimy Ridge Canadian War Memorial and famous WWI landmarks and cemeteries including familiar places or names like Ypres, Passchendaele and the infamous Hill 60 among many others. This evoked an even greater interest and passion in this remarkable chapter of our world history.

A recent discovery while conducting some genealogical research of a distant relative that was awarded the Victoria Cross for bravery and gallantry is worth being documented and a story which you might find of interest. READ ON

“No Irish Need Apply:” The McIvor Family History

The earliest memory I have of my grandfather, William John McIvor (after whom I was named) and grandmother Catherine Brady McIvor (nee McCann) were their brogue Scottish accents, particularly that of my grandfather. Both were born in Glasgow, Scotland.

Margaret Mary was the first child of  William and Catherine McIvor and my mother. She married Theodore John Anhorn on April 14th 1950. I was born on December 18th, 1950 and was their first child and the first grandchild of William and Catherine McIvor.

My mother was extremely proud of her Scottish roots and until her death most recently prominently displayed the Campbell Clan tartan and plaque on her wall. She was always quick to boast of her Scottish heritage.

From very early in my life when asked about my own heritage, I was quickly identified myself as half German (Anhorn) and half Scottish (McIvor).

Most recently however, while conducting some genealogy research in relation to our McIvor family tree, I discovered, much to my surprise, that my family originated not from Scotland but rather Ireland and that my true ancestry therefore is not Scottish but Irish! READ ON