The Canadian Traveler and Trip Cancellation Insurance and Trip Interruption Insurance

The Canadian Traveler and Trip Cancellation and Trip Interruption Insurance

“Are You in Good Hands?”

In an earlier article entitled, “Travel Insurance and the “Pre-Existing Condition” Enigma and the Canadian Visitor to the United States of America (or Elsewhere), I outlined in some detail the necessity for some form of travel insurance for those Canadians that spend an extended period of time down south, far from the cold frigid temperatures, which we typically experience during the months January through March. For those of us who are retired and are living the “good” life, we often plan while we are still continue to be in good health, the occasional holiday or extended holiday to Europe or other destinations beyond North America.

My wife and I together with another couple are planning a 10-day Baltic cruise in the spring with stops in Stockholm, Helsinki, St. Petersburg and other notable cities and ports along the way. Another couple, who we know well, are planning a hiking holiday to Italy and Croatia and when recently talking about our upcoming adventures, one of our friends enquired about whether or not we were planning to get trip cancellation or trip interruption insurance. To be honest, I hadn’t given it much thought but on further reflection and further prompting from her, I decided to investigate these additional product offerings made available to the Canadian traveler by the insurance industry and others.READ ON

The Plight Of the Genealogical Inquirer(2019)

 

I have always enjoyed history. By definition, genealogy is the study of families and the tracing of their lineages and documenting their history for the benefit of future generations. So it was quite natural for me to take an interest in this subject. As a result, I have from time to time researched and documented my own family history, at first, for what purpose, I wasn’t exactly sure. I found it very interesting and often exhilarating as you made a new discovery but also frustrating, as you track down numerous dead ends. In my research, I came across an article which explains the “plight” of the genealogical inquirer and “why” we take up such an endeavour as to research our ancestry.  Read on

 

The Deadman’s Penny-A Medicine Hat Mystery Solved!

I have always enjoyed writing and storytelling, as many of my friends will attest. I have also always had a keen interest in history and more recently genealogy. I have written a number of articles lately and have posted some on my personal homepage William J Anhorn QC-  My venture into genealogy has resulted in some interesting results, not the least of which is establishing a family connection to royalty, or assisting others in the discovery of  a family pedigree, all of which I have documented on the website.

Most recently, my genealogical research and interest in history intersected resulting in this article entitled “The Deadman’s Penny-A Medicine Hat Mystery Solved! ”. Someone, who had come into possession of a rare artifact from WW I, reached out and requested assistance. This resulted in an unusual challenge, which required all of my investigative skills as an amateur genealogist. The challenge- to identify and explain this interesting relic from the Great War, unique to Medicine Hat and to find the existence of a living family member. The request resulted in uncovering an interesting part of history from WWI that has a distinctive Medicine Hat connection. Let me explain.

A Tribute To a True Medicine Hat Hero and Advocate

The Honourable Russell (Russ) Armitage Dixon, Q.C. 
November 14, 1924 – Medicine Hat, Alberta 
December 9, 2018 – Calgary, Alberta 
Russell Dixon, beloved husband of Sheila Dixon (nee Sinton), passed away peacefully on Sunday, December 9, 2018 at the age of 94 years.

 

A distinguished lawyer and jurist who proudly claimed Medicine Hat as his birthplace passed away peacefully at Calgary, Alberta on Sunday, December 9th 2018 at the age of 94 years. Read On

The Mysterious Life of Constance Mary Greenwood

Constance Mary Greenwood was born in Calgary, Alberta, Canada on the 16th day of April 1920 and was the only daughter of Robert and Hannah Greenwood. “Aunt Hannah’s” maiden name was Williams. “Connie” was the cousin of my wife’s father, Norman Medlicott of Medicine Hat, Alberta and throughout our marriage she was an integral part of our family. Having never married, she was a regular guest at our home at the many family celebrations we had, whether it was Christmas or Thanksgiving or any other family get together. My fondest memories, with all the excitement surrounding Christmas, was to arrange to meet the Greyhound bus in Medicine Hat and to pickup “Cousin Connie” as she travelled from Calgary to Medicine Hat and either take her to our home or to my wife’s parents home for the Christmas holidays. This was a ritual, which occurred for many, many years. She was very well read and extremely bright and everyone wanted her on his or her team for the annual after Christmas dinner “Trivial Pursuit” tournament.

Connie was a member of the Canadian Women’s Army Corp during WWII [CWAC] and we often joked about her role during the war as a “resistance fighter” having parachuted into France behind enemy lines in the months before D-Day and working with the French Resistance fighting the Nazis prior to the invasion. Her role during the war was always a mystery to us, as she seldom talked about her “wartime” experience but when pressed when she would say that she simply had “worked” in the laundry in England! This was met with some amusement and much skepticism!READ ON

The Lawyers Medlicott

 

I have always had a keen interest in genealogy and over time have researched and endeavored to document my own family history (Anhorn/McIvor), for what purpose I am not exactly sure. I find it very interesting, often exhilarating as you make a new discovery but it is also frustrating as you track numerous dead ends in the quest to document one’s family history. A recent discovery caused me to start yet another project, which I had thought about for some time but one for which I could never find the time, and that was to document the family history of my wife’s family[Joan Elaine Medlicott] and my inherited family/surname MEDLICOTT. As a result I have written several articles which have been posted on personal homepage-William J Anhorn QC-http://wjanhorn.ca

 

As a retired “barrister and solicitor”, one of the interesting discoveries in my research was the fact that many of the Medlicott ancestors attended schools of higher learning including such renown institutions as Oxford and Cambridge and became doctors and lawyers or followed similar occupations[1]. One of the intriguing revelations was the number of Medlicott descendants from the earliest of times in England to the present who have been called to the “Bar” and the many of them who in turn, dedicated themselves to what has been described by one notable politician as one of the noblest of professions. “Public service, when it’s done honorably and it’s done well, is the noblest of professions.”[2]

READ ON

 

[1] Medlicott, Henry Edmondstone see  http://www.fam.medlicott.uk.com

[2] Ed Koch, former Mayor of New York, “The late Ed Koch, beloved former mayor of New York City, was an immensely quotable politician, delivering brash bon mots as only a Bronx-born New Yorker could. But the words printed underneath his portrait at his memorial service best sum up Koch’s legacy: “Public service, when it’s done honorably and it’s done well, is the noblest of professions.”

Effective Board Governance and the Role Of Committees

Effective Board Governance and the Role of Committees

 

The structure of a Board and the planning of the Board’s work are key elements to effective governance. Establishing committees is perceived to be one way of better managing the work of the Board, thereby strengthening and enhancing the Board’s governance role.

Historically, it has been common practice for Boards, using a traditional governance model, to strike various standing committees to deal with major functional areas of the organization.  Each Board committee would work closely with the management team or staff member responsible for this functional area. They would work together in addressing issues, solving problems, developing internal policies and establishing plans to monitor performance and compliance within each functional area.

For example, it was commonplace for a Board to establish a human resource or staffing committee, who would work with the HR manager to develop HR policies including hiring, conduct, discipline, compensation and performance. It was expected that the work of the committee would “filter” up to the Board and from time to time the Board would be asked to approve some high level policies. For the most part, however, the establishment of work related policies was left to the committee to approve and for management to implement and the work of the committee was largely unseen by the board, except for approving perfunctory minutes from the committee meetings and receiving a brief verbal report from the chair of the committee at the Board meeting.READ ON

 

 

Isaac? Of Pulverbatch, Salop-Another Genealogical Mystery Solved!

The amateur genealogist searching the Medlicott family tree will find a treasure trove of information on the website created by Phil Medlicott found at www.fam.medlicott.uk.com

One of the most interesting and useful tools on any enquiry is the “ARMS” pedigree found on the website, which was one of the earliest recorded efforts to document the Medlicott family.(see below)

I have referenced this family tree on many occasions, as I have endeavored to catalogue the ancestors of my wife, Joan Elaine Medlicott. I have written several articles which I have posted on my own personal website wjanhorn.ca and as a result have had several enquiries from overseas regarding their own connection to our branch of the Medlicott family. It is of some interest to note in reviewing the “ARMS” pedigree that standing out almost alone in the third line is reference to “Isaac? Of Pulverbatch Salop”. In response to a recent enquiry regarding the ancestors of a current Shropshire resident (John David William Chilton) and his relationship to this branch of the Medlicott family, I have had occasion to research this incongruity, which has taken me on another genealogical adventure.

Read more

The Shropshire Star

The Shropshire Star is a newspaper that serves the various towns and communities in the County of Shropshire, England, UK including the hamlet of Medlicott. It is from here that my wife Joan’s ancestors (Medlicott) originated.
On a whim I sent my “Medlicott articles” to the editor. Much to my surprise, a piece was put in the local newspaper. Here is the result:
https://www.shropshirestar.com/news/nostalgia/2017/10/24/shropshire-family-link-to-princess-di/

McIver/McIvor/McCann Clan: A Family History

My earliest of memory of my grandfather, William John McIvor (after whom I was named) and grandmother Catherine Brady McIvor (nee McCann) were their brogue Scottish accents, particularly that of my grandfather. Both were born in Glasgow, Scotland. My mother was extremely proud of her Scottish heritage and until most recently prominently displayed the Campbell Clan tartan and plaque on her wall. From very early in my life when asked about my heritage, I was quick to identify myself as German (Anhorn) and Scottish (McIvor).

Most recently, while conducting genealogy research concerning our McIvor family tree, I discovered, much to my surprise, that my family originated not from Scotland but rather Ireland and that my ancestry is not Scottish but Irish! Read more by clicking on the link below

McIver/